Normalize

Thanks for the declicking, I will look into that.



Here is my latest clip with the chains effects recommended applied.

I think I like it! (aside from a few mouth clicks)

When you record, you should make sure Audacity is the only thing running. Sometimes chat or conferencing programs will automatically open in the background and not tell you. If you used Skype in the past and didn’t tell it specifically to stop working, it’s probably back there running right now, waiting for an incoming call. I don’t know how to check this on Windows.

You can make sure Windows 10 resets itself best by Shift-Shutdown and then later Start instead of regular Shutdown or Restart. Shift-Shutdown clears more things.

You can go into Windows setups and make sure Windows is not applying any corrections or processing to your voice.

https://manual.audacityteam.org/man/windows_accessing_the_windows_sound_controls.html

Windows has a sound control panel with a bouncing sound meter. You can use that to make sure you have healthy volume. Don’t be fooled by the panel pictures. It thinks almost everything is a microphone. Yes, those pictures are from Windows 7.


Screen Shot 2019-12-12 at 18.21.47.png
I’m not a Windows elf, so you’re on your own or we can wait for a Windows elf to help.

You can test yourself. You don’t have to repeatedly post. If your raw recording has nice healthy tall blue waves, you should be good to go. If they’re short and tiny like your last post, that’s going to cause troubles. Shifting back and forth between those two erratically is probably what’s causing the majority of your problems.

https://forum.audacityteam.org/t/normalize/54779/36

There is a sister posting with an erratic computer and that poster simply re-recorded all the damaged chapters.

Koz

Great, thanks again.

I will look into all of that.

We should also remember that all this fuss is only so you can reliably pass the technical specifications (ACX Check). You also have to pass Human Quality Control. They worry more about lip smacks, p-pops and whistling between your teeth. There’s no way to easily test for that in software. There must be a human there listening.

That’s where the DeEsser, DeClicker, tonal filters, and etc come in. Hope you can submit without going through all that.

Koz

I think I like it! (aside from a few mouth clicks)

You can suppress them one by one in post production editing.

Burn a test and see what ACX thinks.

Koz

Possibly “echo cancellation” in Windows audio enhancement could be responsible for the lack of bass :question:

I think I like it!

We should remember your complaint is not that you can’t produce good work. It’s that you couldn’t do it reliably or repeatedly.

ACX puts great stress on having your chapters match, beginning-to-end and to each other.

Their overarching goal is No Distractions. Whatever you do, you have to do it for a whole book or publication.

There was a poster who moved house in the middle of a book. They posted looking for a way to make before and after chapters match. I don’t know that we ever resolved it. The desperation method is read it all again.

Koz

Possibly “echo cancellation” in Windows audio enhancement could be responsible for the lack of bass > :question: > …

‘‘communicate’’ before-after bass-boost.wav

Thank you, when in the sequence should you apply bass boost?

(I patched your posting appearance - koz)

“echo cancellation” in Windows audio enhancement

Get rid of Windows Echo Cancellation. That should be buried somewhere in Windows Enhancements.

Windows comes out of the wrapper set for business communications and conferencing no matter what it does to the voice (like a cellphone). It causes no end of problems for people trying to create good theatrical quality.

“Correcting the bass” will throw two different tools against each other. Effect > Equalization whose job it is to suppress far/extreme bass tones, and whichever tool you use to boost the bass tones.

These tools only work perfectly when you start with a plain, clean recording.

Koz

Windows audio enhancements on W8, (turn all off).gif
If digital enhancements are not the cause, it could be an acoustic cancellation-effect,
e.g. if the mic is in a small box with reflective surfaces.

Thanks again, looking into everything. It seems to be more stable in the past few days.

It seems to be more stable in the past few days.

Hollywood has a “Director Detector Service.” Everything is checked twice and all is in perfect order for a movie shoot … until the Director walks onto the set. I don’t know what it is. They have an aura or something, but if there is anything unstable anywhere it will pick that exact instant to crash.

I know how to make your computer fail. Start reading an important, critical job.

Koz

Ha, just over here hoping for the best for now

Sample uploaded and accepted…negotiating my first offer.

:smiley:

Congrats. You’re half-way to your retirement cottage at Mal d’ Mere on the French Coast.

Koz