Beginner's question about room acoustics for spoken word

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cprima
Posts: 4
Joined: Tue Feb 23, 2021 9:34 pm
Operating System: Windows 10

Re: Beginner's question about room acoustics for spoken word

Post by cprima » Sat Mar 13, 2021 1:59 pm

Thanks a ton for the feedback!

In the meanwhile I did indeed do a small modification of the wall I am speaking into:
https://imgur.com/QTGkpit
But as I need to also hang a projector in that spot it will take me a second attempt to "nail it" -- drywall ceiling vs structural weight bearing capabilities vs wife acceptance factor require further refinement! ;)

Will focus not on the room though -- rather my client proposed a specific project so "content" is now my main priority.

kozikowski
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Joined: Thu Aug 02, 2007 5:57 pm
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Re: Beginner's question about room acoustics for spoken word

Post by kozikowski » Sat Mar 13, 2021 2:29 pm

If you have a construction option, don't make the walls straight. There was a "studio" at a place where I worked which only had thin industrial carpeting on the floor and I don't remember any acoustic ceiling. Plain painted walls. But the walls weren't parallel to each other. If you were paying attention, the ceiling was a little closer to the floor on one side of the room, so it wasn't parallel with the floor.

It was a remarkably dead room—no echoes—and I sent several sound recording jobs through there.

Another location I had an office with perfectly aligned walls and ceiling. I could clap my hands and go to lunch and the clap sound would still be bouncing between the walls when I got back. I didn't record anything in that room.

Koz

kozikowski
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Posts: 69451
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Re: Beginner's question about room acoustics for spoken word

Post by kozikowski » Sat Mar 13, 2021 2:47 pm

There may be a movie trick with your SM7b. Suspend it over your face just out of camera range. The "official goal" is 46cm up and 46cm forward. When I learned it, that was a foot and a half up and a foot and a half forward.

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You didn't say whether you got the Cloud Lifter with your SM7b. If you use the microphone suspended, you may have trouble making noise-free recordings. The SM7b is excellent, but not a loud microphone.

https://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail ... -activator

If you do get a lifter, your microphone preamplifier or interface must be able to supply 48 volts phantom power.

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The lifter uses 48 volts to work. We note that the SM7b does not use phantom power, so it's a good marriage.

Koz

cprima
Posts: 4
Joined: Tue Feb 23, 2021 9:34 pm
Operating System: Windows 10

Re: Beginner's question about room acoustics for spoken word

Post by cprima » Sat Mar 13, 2021 9:51 pm

I have the European version of the Cloudlifter, the Dutch FetHead. Used it in that sample recording.
Their form factor is great, almost not noticeable between microphone and cable, right on the boom pole.

And at work I have now a entry-level lavalier mic, by the way -- your suggestion did not go unnoticed.

With the room now "ticked off" I am indeed now looking forward to some experiments with mic placement and " personal EQ profile ". Hypothesis is that my chronic sinusitis might be slightly concealed by a mic placement from above, and at an angle to counter plosives.

These Beyerdynamics DT770 Pro certainly help with the evaluation! Before I had "HiFi headphones", unbelievably (in hindsight) heavy in the lower range! Can't stand the bass now, and they were even sightly more expensive.


My wife fortunately is quite accepting of all this. Even actively interesting in recordings of her own voice. Perdonally I haven't given up on the idea that she should start a podcast in her native language, to convey her professional knowhow (I contributed to the brain drain in her native country by migrating her inter-continental).

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