Where are these RMS/Noise Floor numbers located?

Help for Audacity 2.x.x on Windows.

ImageThis forum is for Audacity 2.x.x on Windows.
Please state which version of Windows you are using,
and the exact three-section version number of Audacity from "Help menu > About Audacity".


Audacity 1.2.x and 1.3.x are obsolete and no longer supported. If you still have those versions, please upgrade at https://www.audacityteam.org/download/.
The old forums for those versions are now closed, but you can still read the archives of the 1.2.x and 1.3.x forums.

Where are these RMS/Noise Floor numbers located?

Permanent link to this post Posted by SharonMF » Tue Mar 13, 2018 10:12 pm

I have wasted 30+ hours on ACX and YouTube and still - no one shows you where the RSM numbers are located - please post a scene shot clearly showing:

-18 to -23 db RMS
-80 Noise Floor

And I have a Blue Yeti mic - do I need to compensate in some way?

What is this Nyquist? how can I use it to check this figures.

Thanks,
Sharon
SharonMF
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Tue Mar 13, 2018 9:35 pm
Operating System: Windows 7

Re: Where are these RMS/Noise Floor numbers located?

Permanent link to this post Posted by DVDdoug » Wed Mar 14, 2018 4:19 am

You'll need to install ACX Check.
DVDdoug
Forum Crew
 
Posts: 3275
Joined: Fri Sep 10, 2010 11:30 pm
Operating System: Windows 10

Re: Where are these RMS/Noise Floor numbers located?

Permanent link to this post Posted by kozikowski » Wed Mar 14, 2018 4:55 am

ACX Check.

You don't have to do it that way, but it's the most convenient. There are ways to fake out the noise measurement in that tool, but overall, it works pretty well.

We published an audiobook mastering process.

viewtopic.php?f=64&t=96103

It's "RMS". Root Mean Square. It's a formal electrical engineering measurement that just happens to work out to loudness. So the three audiobook technical measurements are loudness, peak distortion and background noise.

We do warn you after all this you still have to know how to read aloud. There's no tools to correct that.

Let us know if you get stuck.

Koz
kozikowski
Forum Staff
 
Posts: 40160
Joined: Thu Aug 02, 2007 5:57 pm
Location: Los Angeles
Operating System: OS X 10.9 Mavericks

Re: Where are these RMS/Noise Floor numbers located?

Permanent link to this post Posted by SharonMF » Wed Mar 14, 2018 6:19 am

Test pass.wav
pass test
(1.49 MiB) Downloaded 7 times
THANK YOU for the help! I figured out how to locate and download the ACX Check (the download part was a little confusing) and I figured it out - I think. See Pass file attached.

My method - based on your extraordinary help:

Noise Reduction
Normalize (-6)
Limiter -3 (output) 1.40, 1.40 (Input gain)

Now that I can test clip with this plugin -and pass it - I feel like recording a few of my audiobooks is totally possible :D

Final question: I have a Blue Yeti USB mic is there any type of portable recorder I can use? I noticed the Zoom recorded only has a XLR input. I really hate to drag around my huge loud laptop. If not, I'm thinking of buying a cheap mini laptop to record on and export audio to an external hard drive. In some cases, the mini laptops ($250) are cheaper than a 4 channel Zoom recorder. Would that work?

Thanks again Koz and the first person who answered me!
SharonMF
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Tue Mar 13, 2018 9:35 pm
Operating System: Windows 7

Re: Where are these RMS/Noise Floor numbers located?

Permanent link to this post Posted by DVDdoug » Wed Mar 14, 2018 3:40 pm

Final question: I have a Blue Yeti USB mic is there any type of portable recorder I can use? I noticed the Zoom recorded only has a XLR input.
The USB mic is only going to work with a computer (and you can only use one USB mic at a time). The Yeti Pro has an XLR connection.

But, I assume the Zoom has a built-in mic and it may be perfectly acceptable. You may also be able to get acceptable quality with a smart phone. (In both cases it would be a good idea to use a stand for good-consistent mic-placement.)

I really hate to drag around my huge loud laptop.
That brings-up another issue... Most "problems" are related to acoustics. You need a good-quiet "studio" set-up and you need a consistent setup so you get the same overall sound every time. And for the same reason, you wouldn't want to record half of the book with the Yeti and the other half with the Zoom mic.

If not, I'm thinking of buying a cheap mini laptop to record on and export audio to an external hard drive. In some cases, the mini laptops ($250) are cheaper...
A small laptop should work as long as it's running Windows.

than a 4 channel Zoom recorder.
I assume you don't need 4 channels?
DVDdoug
Forum Crew
 
Posts: 3275
Joined: Fri Sep 10, 2010 11:30 pm
Operating System: Windows 10

Re: Where are these RMS/Noise Floor numbers located?

Permanent link to this post Posted by kozikowski » Thu Mar 15, 2018 5:53 am

My method - based on your extraordinary help:

You're welcome, but that's not my extraordinary help. That's the other process somebody else published. My mastering publication started with a rumble filter and uses special RMS Normalize.

viewtopic.php?f=64&t=96103

Use either one—whichever one works for you. Fair warning that ACX wants all the chapters to match, so there is no swapping processes in the middle of the book.

Koz
kozikowski
Forum Staff
 
Posts: 40160
Joined: Thu Aug 02, 2007 5:57 pm
Location: Los Angeles
Operating System: OS X 10.9 Mavericks

Re: Where are these RMS/Noise Floor numbers located?

Permanent link to this post Posted by kozikowski » Thu Mar 15, 2018 5:33 pm

I noticed the Zoom recorded only has a XLR input.

Did you also notice the Zoom has microphones?

Many people found the built-in Zoom microphones work measurably better than the XLR connection, no matter which microphone you plug in.

So no, you don't need to lug the whole computer hoo-haa along with you to make a good recording. There was a radio show that worked around an experienced voice performer who locked herself into a hotel closet...and left the recorder running. The tiny, stand-alone recorder.

Do you have an iPhone?

Image

The only shortcoming I found so far is the good quality sound recorder APP insists on creating CAF (Core Audio Files) and nobody can open them.

Do you have a different phone? Does it have a good quality recorder?

In my case, Voice Memo is the software with moderate distortion caused echo cancellation and noise reduction, but you can get the free Music Memo which has no such restrictions.

It could be argued a Windows machine is one of the worst ways to record a voice because of all the other things Windows is doing during the show, over and above being noisy.

Koz
kozikowski
Forum Staff
 
Posts: 40160
Joined: Thu Aug 02, 2007 5:57 pm
Location: Los Angeles
Operating System: OS X 10.9 Mavericks


Return to Windows



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 16 guests