Noise Reduction remnants.

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Re: Noise Reduction remnants.

Permanent link to this post Posted by Trebor » Sun Feb 25, 2018 5:15 am

MichloIW wrote:... I've still never managed to eliminate them from the source (me!)

Are you sure it's you rather than the microphone diaphragm rebounding ? : have you tried another mic ?.
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Re: Noise Reduction remnants.

Permanent link to this post Posted by kozikowski » Sun Feb 25, 2018 5:29 am

microphone diaphragm rebounding

I'm not sure I know that one. What causes a rebound error?

Koz
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Re: Noise Reduction remnants.

Permanent link to this post Posted by kozikowski » Sun Feb 25, 2018 5:35 am

And another note, the Raw Clip peaks come in roughly -15dB, missing the louder -6dB to -10dB recommended live performance volume range. That, too causes stress on the post production process. You can reduce the volume of the background noise or you can get louder. Both work.

Both together are recommended.

Koz
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Re: Noise Reduction remnants.

Permanent link to this post Posted by Trebor » Sun Feb 25, 2018 6:03 am

kozikowski wrote:
microphone diaphragm rebounding

I'm not sure I know that one. What causes a rebound error?

The diaphragm gets momentarily stuck* in a displaced position, then frees itself suddenly with a click.
[ * saliva can act as low-tack glue, similar to a post-it-note becoming detached under its own weight ]

If the microphone diaphragm getting stuck is the source of the clicking, it will also occur with sound sources other than voices, e.g. barking dogs, electric-blender, loudspeakers, etc, provided they are as loud as the voice.
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Re: Noise Reduction remnants.

Permanent link to this post Posted by kozikowski » Sun Feb 25, 2018 8:02 pm

The diaphragm gets momentarily stuck* in a displaced position, then frees itself suddenly with a click.

That's when you get the capsule replaced. Depending on the microphone, plates touching will cause the bias to blow a hole in the diaphragm.

Yet another reason to avoid blowing into any microphone.

It's good to know what was being shot to cause that kind of damage. My cheap and inexpensive Behringer C1 is rated for 136 dBSPL. That's like recording a diesel locomotive while a jet is going over.

I was in an audio class once when the presenter took out of a special pouch an actual microphone diaphragm. He held it over the desk and let go. It took four seconds for it to flutter down. So in general, working to specifications and permanently damaged are the only two conditions for a condenser microphone.

If you can trace diaphragm noise causing voice damage, you have a broken microphone.

There is one relatively new cause of voice damage in a condenser mic. There is at least one microphone out there claiming to work from the computer 5 volts. It doesn't, but they say it does for maximum sales. What they very highly recommend in the instructions is to run it from the usual 48 volts phantom power.

So this is a case of a microphone broken condition and factory specifications overlapping.

Koz
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Re: Noise Reduction remnants.

Permanent link to this post Posted by MichloIW » Sun Feb 25, 2018 8:42 pm

Fellas,

thank you very much.

I thought I had removed background noise (I even turn off the fridge for the duration of recording) but I shall check again.

It IS possible that the microphone is damaged. It is an old Rode NT2 which was gifted to me and it DOES have a small dent in the mesh. :( I'm not sure how to check for further damage but I shall do the test of recording another noise besides my voice.

I'll also try your settings, Koz as I can't re-record this current project.

Cheers. :)
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Re: Noise Reduction remnants.

Permanent link to this post Posted by kozikowski » Mon Feb 26, 2018 3:10 am

an old Rode NT2

There's nothing delicate about an NT2. It's rated at 147dBSPL. That's like recording a diesel locomotive with two jets going over. The "basket" (grill on the front) is made to be a little gooshy so as not to get in the way of the sound, so I'm not shocked if it took a hit here and there. As long as nobody dropped it out a window, you should be good to go.

There's nothing wrong with your voice presentation. Not a problem writing a check for that. We just have to get your noise level down.

Make sure you're speaking into the company name side and the switch on the front is heart-shaped. That prevents sound from coming in from the back. The switch on the back (L, _, -10dB) should be in the middle.

That's a good quality analog XLR microphone. How are you getting it into the computer? Like the very old world maps used to say, "Here Be Dragons."

There is a review which claims (probably rightly) this microphone was designed to work into older mixers and amplifiers and tends to be a little bright to make up for everything else being a bit dull. They offer a capsule change to fix that, but I suspect you can get away with a little equalization. This will help your sibilance and ticking, too.

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Re: Noise Reduction remnants.

Permanent link to this post Posted by kozikowski » Mon Feb 26, 2018 3:39 am

In cases this got lost, I'm following this audiobook mastering document.

viewtopic.php?f=64&t=96103

If you already have everything, it's just three tools listed under — Process:

After that, Effect > Noise Reduction 9, 6, 6.

Yes, from earlier, where you get the profile noise sample makes a big difference. The audiobook requirements I've seen want you to include some Room Tone (hold your breath and don't move) in addition to the show. That's a good place to get the Noise Reduction profile. Resist the urge to Generate Silence in those areas instead of using Room Tone. They don't like your background popping up and down in volume.

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Re: Noise Reduction remnants.

Permanent link to this post Posted by Trebor » Mon Feb 26, 2018 9:12 am

MichloIW wrote: It IS possible that the microphone is damaged. It is an old Rode NT2 which was gifted to me and it DOES have a small dent in the mesh. :( I'm not sure how to check for further damage but I shall do the test of recording another noise besides my voice.

Slowing the click down by 12x makes it sound like a empty tin-can ...

click sounds like tin-can when slowed-down.flac
slowed-click sounds mechanical, rather than human.
(422.15 KiB) Downloaded 12 times

Scaling a diaphragm up by 12x would be about the size of the end of a tin-can.
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Re: Noise Reduction remnants.

Permanent link to this post Posted by MichloIW » Mon Feb 26, 2018 8:56 pm

kozikowski wrote:
an old Rode NT2

There's nothing delicate about an NT2. It's rated at 147dBSPL. That's like recording a diesel locomotive with two jets going over. The "basket" (grill on the front) is made to be a little gooshy so as not to get in the way of the sound, so I'm not shocked if it took a hit here and there. As long as nobody dropped it out a window, you should be good to go.

There's nothing wrong with your voice presentation. Not a problem writing a check for that. We just have to get your noise level down.

Make sure you're speaking into the company name side and the switch on the front is heart-shaped. That prevents sound from coming in from the back. The switch on the back (L, _, -10dB) should be in the middle.

That's a good quality analog XLR microphone. How are you getting it into the computer? Like the very old world maps used to say, "Here Be Dragons."

There is a review which claims (probably rightly) this microphone was designed to work into older mixers and amplifiers and tends to be a little bright to make up for everything else being a bit dull. They offer a capsule change to fix that, but I suspect you can get away with a little equalization. This will help your sibilance and ticking, too.

Koz


Thanks, Koz.

It is connected to a Focusrite Scarlett 2i2:

https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B00 ... UTF8&psc=1

Yup, I'm speaking into the company name side though mine has the switches on opposite sides to what you mention. The (L, _, -10dB) is on the same side as Rode. Mine WAS set to L so I've moved it to the centre. I was also disappointed to see that my rear switch was set to the circle, not the heart shape. I've fixed that. I could have sworn I had it set to carotid when I looked these up with the help of a fellow voice artist months ago. Perhaps in adjusting it to the holder, the switch was knocked.

Cheers.
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