Recording equipment for voice

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Tapehead
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Re: Recording equipment for voice

Post by Tapehead » Fri Aug 29, 2014 1:29 pm

I enjoyed the video.

I think I'll try and pick up a zoom on ebay.

kozikowski
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Re: Recording equipment for voice

Post by kozikowski » Fri Aug 29, 2014 5:50 pm

You do have to predict the future. The H4 can accept an XLR microphone in its base, but the H1 can't. Sift through the feature set and make sure it matches what you want to do. Also Google "complaints." Reviews are nice, but I go for the complaints. Those are not likely to be written by the maker or the supplier.

Koz
Last edited by kozikowski on Fri Apr 24, 2015 3:34 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Reason: Typo

Tapehead
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Re: Recording equipment for voice

Post by Tapehead » Fri Aug 29, 2014 11:34 pm

Good point about the future, I confess I wasn't really taking that into account.

I know what you mean about checking out negative reviews, even when they are genuine reviewers, many buyers appear to jump like lemmings over the " Great product - delivered ahead of time" cliff especially on Amazon. This after owning it for a mere week or two.

kozikowski
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Re: Recording equipment for voice

Post by kozikowski » Sat Aug 30, 2014 2:48 am

Particularly if the "reviews" appear to be copy and pastes of each other.

"Never has the sound world been so excited about the introduction...."

There is one possible problem with negative reviews. You need to weed out the ones written by somebody attempting to use the product or service wrong.

"The H64 recorder did not make me irresistible to my dates or result in world peace. -1."


I refer to one review of a small sound mixer who pointed out its inability to properly accept high-end, phantom-powered microphones. The promotional words cleverly danced around that problem. It wasn't the first review, either.

Koz

jarrodlsb
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Re: Recording equipment for voice

Post by jarrodlsb » Sat Nov 29, 2014 6:35 pm

that sounds like a pretty sweet setup. i like the flexibility it provides. how much did it cost you to set it up?

James-Parker
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Re: Recording equipment for voice

Post by James-Parker » Thu Jan 26, 2017 11:34 am

Any Blue Spark USB Mic tends to do the trick for me.

Dman883
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Re: Recording equipment for voice

Post by Dman883 » Thu Aug 16, 2018 12:22 am

I started doing voice overs for the books I write. I bought a Scarlett Solo 2nd gen setup that came with an AT2020 condenser mic. From what I understand, condenser mics are generally preferred for voice overs, but I'm thinking about getting a dynamic cardoid mic shure SM58-CN or sm57 since I don't have a soundproof booth and I'm getting a lot of background noise. I can clean it up in post production, but I want to do as little processing as possible. Has anyone used the SM58-CN or for voice overs? I've read several articles online and some people say it works fine for the most part. What do you think? I don't drop $100 for a mic I won't end up using. Thanks

kozikowski
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Re: Recording equipment for voice

Post by kozikowski » Thu Aug 16, 2018 1:53 am

I don't have a soundproof booth and I'm getting a lot of background noise. I can clean it up in post production, but I want to do as little processing as possible.
I did change my mind over the centuries. By far the most valuable thing I have is a soundproof third bedroom. Patrick, the kid who lived here two families ago played drums. Probably in self-defense, the family soundproofed the small third bedroom. It's got carpeting on the floor and all five surfaces have thick Home Store sound tiles.

I can make any microphone work.

CurdsAndWhey-500t.jpg
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That's an Olympus recorder with the ability to straight record—no processing, and it will save a WAV file.

180627_0107CurdsAndWheyFinal.mp3
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I'm not a performer, but that sounds exactly like me (breaths and all).

It passes ACX Check with very gentle noise reduction (6dB) and Mastering Suite 4. I have since duplicated the effort with a roll of paper towels instead of a cardboard box with the idea that everybody has access to paper towels. Not everyone has access to a cardboard box and the paper is acoustically superior.

OlympusWS823PaperTowel-500t.jpg
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I don't agree that a condenser microphone is the automatic first choice, particularly if you have a ratty environment. Crisp, clear condenser microphones don't survive heavy processing particularly well. They get harsh, sharp and strident making yet even more processing necessary. Count the number of times "De-Essing" comes up in posts. That happens when your "S" sounds will cut through wood and fog your glasses. That can either happen or get worse with stiff noise reduction.

This is where performances split. That's all you need to read for audiobooks. There is no balky computer interface or fan noise. The computer is in another room turned off.

I'm eventually going to bow to convention and include a tablet instead of printing the script on paper.

If you're performing music, then you'll need the microphone, interface, computer, headphones etc. That's overdubbing. You're stuck.

I need to try this trick with the Zoom. I have an H4 (no "n").

I still have dwindling but still alive hope for the iPhone, in which case nobody would need to buy anything. I haven't hit the right spells yet. It seems people do this all the time.

CorkerStandupper-650w.jpg
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So my idea is set up as simple as possible and when the shekels start to roll in, then think about upgrading to different microphones and techniques. You can choose any new microphone you want because you don't have to struggle with the room.

The longest message on the forum was Ian trying to record paid voice work from his noisy apartment in Hollywood. 39 forum chapters and about a year. He eventually got it to work; he's a paid performer. How long do you have?

ACX wants you to maintain consistency through one publication. A stand-alone recorder lets you crank out work while you're struggling to get your Yeti to run.

Koz

kozikowski
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Re: Recording equipment for voice

Post by kozikowski » Thu Aug 16, 2018 2:06 am

Has anyone used the SM58-CN or for voice overs? I've read several articles online and some people say it works fine for the most part
I'm having trouble finding an SM58-CN. Is that the version with the on-off switch? I know what an SM58 is. That's a rock band microphone.

So borrow one from a rock band. If you're one of those people struggling through equalization, filtering and De-Essing with your current microphone, this will be the sun coming up. "Professional, Studio" condenser microphones and noisy rooms don't mix.

Koz

kozikowski
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Re: Recording equipment for voice

Post by kozikowski » Thu Aug 16, 2018 2:22 am

Most of these units (except the iPhone) are stereo. Theory has it if I straight mix down stereo to mono for a voice track, it should decrease the noise. The show is coming from one place, my voice, but the noise is coming from two different microphones. So it should give me ...... square root of the doobly-doo....about 3dB less FFFFFFFF noise without doing anything else.

We like free noise reduction.

Koz

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