Recording from digital radio (DAB) / Edirol UA-1EX

Last week I bought an Edirol UA-1EX digital interface to use with my Dell Inspiron, which only has a mic input and headphone output (not really good enough for transferring analogue tapes).

i tested it first with an analogue source and it was excellent.

When I tried recording from the digital output of a Pure Evoke 2 DAB radio (Audacity* sampling at 44.1 kHz) it worked perfectly – except that the audio pitch was slightly lowered. This was obvious if you were familiar with the voice of the broadcaster, but certainly usable. (Your granny wouldn’t notice anything amiss).

I confess I do not understand the niceties of how this could happen. Pure support tell me “The audio signal is sent at 48kHz and 16bit.”

When I altered the settings on Audacity to 48 kHz the pitch was correct, but the audio was peppered with ‘holes’ and quite unusable.

If anyone can tell me what I’m doing wrong I should be most grateful.

Richard
*PS: I am using the 1.3 beta version of Audacity.

So it records fine at 44.1kHz, but “peppered with holes” at 48kHz -

The difference here is that there is more “bits per second” at 48kHz, and it sounds like the system is having difficulty keeping up with that amount of data. You could try increasing the “Audio Buffers” (you will find that setting in “Edit → Preferences → Audio I/O”) and see if that helps.

Also, defragging your hard drive and shutting down any background applications will improve performance.

Thanks for your reply, Steve.

Everything works beautifully now that I have reverted to the stable release of Audacity. It works at 48kHz and, hey, it works at 44.1 into the bargain. And I deliberately tried it with a number of other programs and processes running. I suppose the moral is: Don’t try new kit with the beta version until you’ve had it working with the stable version!

If anyone reads this and can tell me which parameters need altering on the 1.3 releases of Audacity I would appreciate a note. It would be nice to have the timer facility to record digital radio.

Richard

Did you try increasing the audio buffers?

BTW, you can have both the stable version and the beta version installed as long as they are in different directories. (but only run one at a time).

Thanks again, Steve. Yes, I did increase the audio buffers. The good news is that with the very latest beta now installed, I can do all I want including recording and playback of digital radio at 44.1 (or other sample rates).

There’s now a toolbar which displays the interfaces in use, which is very useful to people like me now with a choice.

I don’t know if it’s a result of installing Audacity 1.3.4-beta (since the previous beta has now been swallowed,) but I’m a happy bunny now.

I notice there is a facility to display, save or print the interface parameter settings: It would be very useful in diagnosing problems from amateurs like me.


Example:

Default capture device number: 1
Default playback device number: 4

Device ID: 0
Device name: MME: Microsoft Sound Mapper - Input
Input channels: 2
Output channels: 0
Low Input Latency: 0.200000
Low Output Latency: 0.200000
High Input Latency: 0.400000
High Output Latency: 0.400000
Supported Rates:

Device ID: 1
Device name: MME: EDIROL UA-1EX
Input channels: 2
Output channels: 0
Low Input Latency: 0.200000
Low Output Latency: 0.200000
High Input Latency: 0.400000
High Output Latency: 0.400000
Supported Rates:
8000
16000
22050
44100
48000
96000

Device ID: 2
Device name: MME: SigmaTel Audio
Input channels: 2
Output channels: 0
Low Input Latency: 0.200000
Low Output Latency: 0.200000
High Input Latency: 0.400000
High Output Latency: 0.400000
Supported Rates:
8000
16000
22050
44100
48000
96000

Device ID: 3
Device name: MME: Microsoft Sound Mapper - Output
Input channels: 0
Output channels: 2
Low Input Latency: 0.200000
Low Output Latency: 0.200000
High Input Latency: 0.400000
High Output Latency: 0.400000
Supported Rates:
8000
16000
22050
44100
48000
96000
[/more, cut here]



While I have the floor (so to speak) could you very kindly answer two questions for me:

  1. How would I reset this beta version to its factory state (it has inherited settings)?
  2. Have I missed something, or has the plain old Reverb function disappeared?

Cool - glad it’s working for you now - Audacity just seems to be getting better :slight_smile: Of course, with the beta version, there is always the chance that something may break in later betas, but for me v. 1.3.4 has been great.

Yes - handy tool. For the benefit of anyone else reading this, the tool is in “Help → Audio Device Info”

As far as I know, settings for v. 1.3.x are held in “audacity.cfg”. I would expect that re-installing would over-write this file, if not, the file is in:
Windows: Documents and SettingsApplication DataAudacityaudacity.cfg
OS X: ~/Library/Application Support/audacity.cfg
Linux: ~/.audacity-data/audacity.cfg

There is no “plain old Reverb” built into Audacity, but GVerb is available in the LADSPA plugin pack.

The best way of using GVerb in Audacity, is to make a copy of the track and apply GVerb to the copy - you can then adjust the levels of the original and the copy to achieve your desired “wet / dry” balance.
Personally, I find the default setting in GVerb to be far too long a reverb (7.575 seconds) for most occasions, and prefer to reduce it to around 1.5 seconds.