Increase the Amplitude of Low Frequencies - Recording

Hi all,
Today I tried to record the sound output from my Keyboard to Mic input of laptop and I found

  1. The Lower Notes (frequencies) Like C and D have lesser amplitude than higher notes after being recorded :frowning: . How can I increase the amplitude of Lower frequencies?

  2. Also when I play my Keyborad using Sustain effect the sound actually fades for 5 seconds, but the audacity records the sound only for 3 seconds and the last 2 seconds were silence :open_mouth: - Meaning the audacity is clipping out the sound once its reaches a low amplitude threshold. How to fully record the sound diminishing until zero?

I assume that audacity has a minimum threshold for recording frequencies and amplitude, how do I change them? :confused:

Please help! and Thanks!

Today I tried to record the sound output from my Keyboard to Mic input of laptop and I found

That doesn’t usually work. You need a Stereo Line-In on the computer (blue socket) or a USB adapter to provide those connections like this:


That’s my Behringer UCA202. Other people make adapters.

Some laptops have the ability to switch one connection between Stereo-Line and Mono-Microphone consult your instructions, but most don’t.

Then you go into Windows Control Panels and turn off Enhanced Services and any other conferencing tools you can find.

http://manual.audacityteam.org/o/man/faq_recording_troubleshooting.html#enhancements

Koz

Thank you Koz,

I will try to tweak my soundcard settings as per your latter suggestion, however I am trying to understand your first part.
Thanks again!

By the way, How to change the threshold settings?

I assume that audacity has a minimum threshold for recording frequencies and amplitude

No, it doesn’t. It records dead flat from 0dB down to the limits of audibility -96dB and all audio frequencies. Windows, however, has problems. Audacity can only use whatever the computer gives it, and the computer has ideas and settings.

http://manual.audacityteam.org/o/man/faq_recording_troubleshooting.html#enhancements

Koz

I am trying to understand your first part. Thanks again!

Mic-In on a laptop computer is designed to accept a mono microphone.



And only a mono microphone (or headset). It’s not a general stereo audio input like computers used to have. To get a connection for your keyboard, you need the usually missing blue connection like on this PC Desktop sound card.


Or a USB stereo adapter like I posted earlier. I have two keyboards and I connect the stereo headphone out of each keyboard to the stereo in of my computer, or one of those USB adapters.

Mic-In is mono, not stereo and it has serious overload and distortion issues.

Koz