Adapting this mike

Hello all,
First off, this is my first post, so if I make any newbie mistakes, please point them out to me. Secondly, I am sure this issue is across all versions of Audacity, but I still thought this was the best one to have my question. I just upgraded from 2.1.0 to 2.1.1
I have a microphone that records two steams. On the left channel, it records everything in the room. On the right channel, it records away from my voice to just get the sound of my room without my voice. The way I have been doing it is to record my voice in Audacity and then to split them into two different streams invert the right channel and then merge them together to get just my voice. This manual method worked fine until I decided to read a script and I realized that I needed to do this every time I read a new section of the script (times how many times I decided to read the script). I was hoping to find a way to merge this three step process into a single one. I searched the manual and this forum and I found only a technique called chains. Unfortunately chains don’t meet my need as steps one and three are not possible to automate in chains.
My question is: what is the best way to automate this process?
Thanks,
Catzilla4.

Have you written that wrong?

Do you mean that one channel records the room (pointing away from your mouth) and one records the room + your voice (pointing towards your mouth)?

Assuming that I understand correctly what you are recording, I’m surprised that works, because I would have expected the “room sound” in one mic to be mostly out of phase with the “room sound” in the other mic if the two mics are pointing in opposite directions. However, to invert one channel and mix the two channels together can be done in one step using the “Vocal Removal” effect (http://manual.audacityteam.org/o/man/vocal_remover.html)

I think you’re working too hard. Turn the microphone around so the portion that’s recording just the room records just your voice. Make that one mono and kill the other channel.

What’s the microphone? Model numbers?

Koz

Catzilla4 wrote:
On the left channel, it records everything in the room. On the right channel, it records away from my voice to just get the sound of my room without my voice.


Have you written that wrong?

Do you mean that one channel records the room (pointing away from your mouth) and one records the room + your voice (pointing towards your mouth)?

Catzilla4 wrote:
then to split them into two different streams invert the right channel and then merge them together to get just my voice.

Assuming that I understand correctly what you are recording, I’m surprised that works, because I would have expected the “room sound” in one mic to be mostly out of phase with the “room sound” in the other mic if the two mics are pointing in opposite directions. However, to invert one channel and mix the two channels together can be done in one step using the “Vocal Removal” effect (> http://manual.audacityteam.org/o/man/vocal_remover.html> )

Yes that is what I meant, clarity has never been my strong suit. I knew of the vocal remover effect but thought it did more than just invert one channel and merge them together. I also want it to be mono.

I think you’re working too hard. Turn the microphone around so the portion that’s recording just the room records just your voice. Make that one mono and kill the other channel.

What’s the microphone? Model numbers?

Koz

The microphone is meant to be used the way I mentioned. I also can’t adjust where the two microphones are meant to be in relation to each other. The software that the mike came with from what I can tell did the process I described automatically but only captured at 8 khz. Because I wanted to use it with the rest of my audio editing, I had to cobble together a method to get it to work with Audacity. Anyway, it’s the microphone that came with the Turtle Beach XL1 headset. I hooked it to my computer’s microphone jack by a 2.5 mm to 3.5 mm adapter.

I only bring that up because if you have a multiplexed stereo microphone like Mid-Side or one of those instead of straight Left and Right, you would have an omni-directional element and a cardioid element inside the microphone head. If you speak into the rear notch of the cardioid element by accident instead of the front, you would get exactly the sound you have.

I have a headset that allows me to wear the boom on left or right. Because of that, it has the ability to rotate the microphone inside the foam on the end of the boom. It’s trivial to get it wrong because I can’t see the microphone element inside the little foam ball. I have to feel for it, or more importantly, know that I have to feel for it.

Koz

There is a YouTube tutorial about how to do this, but the comments immediately filled up with people who couldn’t make it work.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IqDvcNCAFZE

This guy seemed to be doing a lot more work than a simple size adapter.



**For those whose Microphone is not working after following instructions:

You may need xbox controller drivers:

Plug in a wired xbox 360 controller and connect the 2.5mm into it and then into the game/chat controller. (You’ll need the 2.5mm to 2.5mm audio cable for this)

Then right click on speaker icon bottom right of the screen

Playback devices>Playback (Select speakers and >Set to default)

Then go in to
Recording (Select Headset Microphone and >Set to default)

This default device setup worked for me but may be different for you.

Alternatively if you dont have a wired controller you could probably download both drivers?

Headset Earphone
Afterglow Gamepad for Xbox 360 (Headset)

Headset Microphone
Afterglow Gamepad for Xbox 360 (Headset)**

Koz

To be honest, I don’t know exactly why the subtract the right channel from the left one works to get rid of noise, but it does. I just noticed when I recorded the microphone in audacity that the left channel contained what I wanted with a bunch of noise and that the right channel correlated with the left channel when it came to the noise but it did not have my voice. As a result, what I mentioned earlier was my best guess.

The method he is using to connect his microphone is nearly identical to the one I am using. I just used a cord that had a 2.5 mm male end and 3.5 mm male end (which I previously just called an adapter) instead of the cord and an adapter with a 2.5 mm female end and a 3.5 mm male end. I hope that makes sense, but that bit of information does not matter anyway.
I used to use the second method (albeit I only had a wireless controller), but it was sort of awkward to have an XBox 360 controller being next to me and could only record at 8 khz. I use 48 khz for the rest of my recordings and most of my editing, so I would like to keep it the same.

Still, I think it would really simple to automate splitting a stereo track into two mono tracks, inverting one of them, and putting them back together as a mono stream.

Did you try to get Effect > Vocal Removal to work manually, without the automation? If you can, then it’s just making sure Vocal Removal is in the Chains supported effects list.

[Searching] Which it appears not to be. Shucks.

You might be able to do it manually, except that I don’t see Split Stereo To Mono (from the left-hand drop-down menus) available in Chains, either.

I think that’s the end of the story for automating this.

Koz

Which version of Audacity? I think it should be available in Audacity 2.1.1.

I searched the on-line manual list.

Koz

“Vocal Removal” or “Vocal Reduction and Isolation” (use the “Remove Center Classic: Mono” option) can be added to a Chain in 2.1.1.

Either effect should be enabled by default but if you don’t see then in Effect Menu, use Effect > Manage… to enable them ( http://manual.audacityteam.org/o/man/manage_effects_generators_and_analyzers.html ).


Gale

Well, it seems a chain that sets the vocal remover on simple mode is what I need. I must not have noticed it as the option for both simple mode and to add the vocal remover to the chain were only added in the latest version. Consider this topic closed.

Catzilla4.