Tinny sounding dynamic mic

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Re: Tinny sounding dynamic mic

Permanent link to this post Posted by kozikowski » Sat Mar 18, 2017 6:42 pm

DO NOT stop using a backup microphone.
Koz
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Re: Tinny sounding dynamic mic

Permanent link to this post Posted by kozikowski » Sat Mar 18, 2017 7:04 pm

This is the custom curve, DeCrisper3.XML. Your microphone has a boost at certain tones that are rough on the ear. This helps to suppress those tones. It just takes a little edge off the voice.


Adding Custom Audacity Equalization Curves (LF-rolloff as an example)
-- Select something on a timeline.
-- Effect > Equalization > Save/Manage Curves > Import
-- Select LF_rolloff_for_speech.xml > OK. (it won't open a ZIP. You have to decompress it)
-- LF rolloff for speech now appears in the equalization preset curve list.


I expect the lower-right of the equalization display to look something like this. I don't think I can easily get the whole display on the forum.

Screen Shot 2017-03-18 at 12.02.33.png
Screen Shot 2017-03-18 at 12.02.33.png (22.42 KiB) Viewed 292 times


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Re: Tinny sounding dynamic mic

Permanent link to this post Posted by JoshCohen » Sat Mar 18, 2017 11:05 pm

Thanks Koz this is great.

Why lavs over a standard handheld dynamic mic? (The more you write, the more questions I have!)

Thanks,
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Re: Tinny sounding dynamic mic

Permanent link to this post Posted by kozikowski » Sun Mar 19, 2017 3:38 am

If the environment is noisy, I would be cycling through the bag trying to find the best microphone for the job.

A difficult environment restricts your options and usually increases the price and risk. See: the reason you're here.

If it's difficult enough, you leave standard microphones in the dust and pull out the dusty tricks.

There is a technique where you use two identical hand-held microphones and a special "Y" cable to get them into one XLR-Male for the recorder. The two microphones are wired out of phase—backwards—and you use them taped to each other with the heads together. If you did it right, they won't pick up any background noise at all and you use the microphone system by close-talking directly across one of the two heads. It's not HiFi, but it will get you a working track in high traffic or a noisy factory.

One of the rules is to get the microphone as close as possible to the voice. You may find that a correctly placed lavalier at 6-7 inches below the mouth will pick up a lot less room trash with a better quality voice than trying to struggle with a noise-cancelling microphone on a table five feet away.

Or not. There's no good way to predict what a difficult shoot is going to need. That's what makes it so darn much fun.

The lavalier in the pictures is the Radio Shack 3013, on the market for centuries.

https://www.radioshack.com/collections/ ... e-clip-mic

It's a copy of an Audio Technica model. AT may have made it. Two problems. You need a non-standard adapter to get it plugged into an XLR and it's not particularly crisp. So it would have the opposite problem of your microphone. Slightly dull. It used to come with a tiny wind screen which worked really well for wind, but made the voice even more muffled. Anybody trying to boost crispness is going to run into microphone amplifier noise. Ffffffffffff.


Right about now, you decide the best way to get the performer into your studio.

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Re: Tinny sounding dynamic mic

Permanent link to this post Posted by JoshCohen » Wed Mar 22, 2017 3:18 am

Koz, thanks again for all your feedback. I didn't set up the wooden board like you did in your photo, but I did run out today to the fabric store (maybe the second time in my life I'd been there) and bought some felt padding sheets to use under the desktop mic stands.

Thanks again for your prompt responses. It is a big help.

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Re: Tinny sounding dynamic mic

Permanent link to this post Posted by kozikowski » Wed Mar 22, 2017 7:56 pm

You may need several layers of felt to do any good. Duvetyne is superheavy black toweling (dual-velvet) and I'm not sure anybody could shoot movies without it. A good sub is furniture moving pads. Ignore the microphone and book. That's what's covering the table.

Image

Also see this broadcast shoot. Forget the microphones and look at the table.

Image

What you don't see in that last picture is the soundproofed conference room we're recording in. I treat the office managers very well (Are you comfortable? Can I get you some coffee?) so I can get that room any time I have a sound shoot.

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